Mot Hai Ba Yo (Vo)!

For the Brits, it’s “Cheers!”  For the Japanese, it’s “Kanpai” or “Kampay”.  We really don’t have a Filipino term for toasting.  I googled and found “Mabuhay” which translates to long live — which is actually weird because when you’re drunk all you want to do is crawl to your bed and die.  But then again, you never start drinking drunk.  Or maybe you can but I wouldn’t really know. :P

For the Vietnamese, a loud, hearty, “Mot, hai, ba, YO!”  which translates to “one, two, three, yo!”  Synchronized drinking at it’s best.

When I first heard them in a party, I was actually surprised they can be so loud.  Or maybe it was because I’ve never been in a party with lots of Vietnamese.  I realized that a party is a party is a party.  No matter what your nationality is, when it’s party time, drinking will always be the most important thing.

I remember my bro telling me a story about going to a party where the assigned person to bring beer was late.  They couldn’t get any conversation going and there were lots of awkward silence.  When the guy with the beer finally arrived, the party officially started!  They woke up from their detoxicated stupor.

Anyhoo, I found this Vietnamese-themed shot glasses from Saigon Kitsch which I shall be giving to my friends back in Manila.  This is a tribute to my one-time drunken disorderly day with them.  ONE TIME ONLY!

———–
P.S. Thanks Kyle for clarifying that “Yo” is actually “Vo” which means “in”.  Much, much appreciated!

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3 Responses to Mot Hai Ba Yo (Vo)!

  1. kyle says:

    It is actually “Vo.” It means “in.” The Southerner with their accent pronounce their v’s as d’s (the Vietnamese equivalent of z’s) or “do”, but you hear it as “yo!”
    So it is “one, two, three, in” as I am in and/or “in” as down the hatch. Wanted to clear this up as “vo” does have meaning, not just a sound Vietnamese make before drinking.

  2. lyraliza says:

    Thanks Kyle for this information! :)

  3. Pingback: Guide to Street Food: Vietnam | Off Track Planet

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